Jump to content
Hero
Sign in to follow this  
carla

How often? when switching

Recommended Posts

I'm curious, as I have played a few mouthpieces over the years, how often or how much time you should give yourself to get used to a new mouthpiece before switching?  When I try a new mouthpiece it sounds wonderful for the first few days, then I always seem to find the next few weeks to be difficult when its no longer creating the sound (fullness, tone, intonation) that I'm looking for...

How long do others take when when changing to a new mouthpiece?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also have experienced this.  I find that it takes a few months to get acclimated to a new MP especially when you’re only playing in local community bands a few hours a week...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm there with you Carla.  I swapped mouthpieces a lot early in my playing.  Started with a 7C because that's what the band director said to get.  When I wanted to change after 2 years, I tried a 5C, then 1 1/2C, Shilke 11, Shilke 14A4A, Shilke 13A4,  eventually landing on a Shilke 14A4.  I swapped like every month thinking that was more than enough time to adjust.  When you make small adjustments (like Shilke 14A4A, Shilke 13A4) you can move pretty quickly.  Bigger changes you'll want to give your embouchure time to adjust.   Of course now I'm thinking of playing around with Wick mouthpieces as I have one on my flugelhorn.  

If I may, could you help me understand what gear you have now ?  How long have you been playing, what mouthpiece are you on now ?  And most importantly, what trumpet are you playing (model and bore size) ?

Here's a mouthpiece guide I found if it helps:

https://trumpet.biz/trumpet-mouthpieces/trumpet-mouthpiece-guide/ 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best suggestion I can come up with is to evaluate a mouthpiece once you have gotten to the point where its performance is predictable.  A mouthpiece should enable you to easily produce the timbre you want (within the limits of the player/mouthpiece/instrument combination), crisp articulation, and quick response.  However, ultimately the sound created will be your sound, and the differences in mouthpieces will make relatives changes (due to design) in your sound.  This is why, for instance, the same trumpet or mouthpiece will sound and feel "dark" to one player and "bright" to another.  Some players require considerable time to acclimate, while for others this time can be very short, and one's overall level of ability does not seem to predict how long or short this time frame is; it's a separate, individual skill.

Edited by J. Jericho

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.